Growing Sprouts at Home – James Killion

I love making stir-fry. It’s a quick meal, and an easy way to make use of the leftover food that I’ve been stockpiling. No stir-fry would be complete without a generous pile of bean sprouts on top. Fortunately, bean sprouts are incredibly easy and inexpensive to grow at home. As long as you have a mason jar, a piece of cloth, a rubber band, and running water, you can make your own bean sprouts in a week or less.

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photo credit: http://www.thewoksoflife.com

There are many types of beans and seeds that are suitable for making tasty sprouts. Everyone has had Mung bean sprouts at a Chinese restaurant. Alfalfa, broccoli, radish, and kale are also popular for sprouting. Almost any bean or Brassica will do. At home, I always used broccoli seeds. They have a peppery bite that makes them ideal as a garnish for just about anything. Sprouts are good for more than their taste or texture. Sprouts are very rich in vitamins, minerals, and amino acids, but I’d eat them regardless of the health benefits. I’m going to share my method for growing sprouts at home. It’s very easy, and it’s a perfectly suitable hobby for the impatient.

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photo credit: http://www.soapqueen.com

Place 2-3 tablespoons of your chosen seed/bean into a widemouth mason jar.     Use a rubber band to fasten a cloth to the mouth of the jar. This will keep the seeds from escaping while still allowing water and fresh air to enter the jar. You will need to rinse the seeds at least a couple of times per day. I do one rinse in the morning and one at night. To rinse the seeds, simply pour some fresh water straight through the cloth, swirl it around a bit, and drain the water back out again. Keep your jar of seeds wherever you like. The sprouts do not need any light. I keep mine by a window because I like to watch them grow. Once the sprouts look good enough to eat, pour them onto some paper towels and let them sit until dry. You may store the sprouts in a Ziploc bag in the fridge for a week or a little more. By the time you finish your old sprouts, you can have a whole new batch ready to go.

 

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photo credit: www.superfoods-for-superhealth.com

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